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April 21, 2006

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crojas

comments carried over from naked gaze's former home at blogger:

[also, see comments on parallel thread at Long Sunday]

10 Comments:

Matt said...
Hi, nice to meet you.

I'm a litle confused about that final blockquote...is it not you speaking?

Cheers.
8:21 PM

crojas said...
Thanks Matt.
Throughout, for convenience, I was using the blockquote function to signal my second narrative line (on Beijing Bicycle). In the final two paragraphs, meanwhile, I tried to conclude by bringing the two narrative lines more explicitly into dialogue with each other, and it just worked out that that took place in the "embedded" line. So, yes, it's me speaking, but it's me speaking in a "Beijing Bicycle-meets-Spivak"voice.
6:37 AM

Matt said...
thanks for clarifying, crojas.
2:47 PM

Le Colonel Chabert said...
love the vivid image of spivak riding her two wheeled vehicle (marx/derrida) swiftly (down from the moutaintop?)... and this fugue of the two 'use' values (material, mystical), also producing two exchange values; she possesses marxism and is possessed by deconstruction; she commodifies and is commodified herself.

I don't remember which of the Value essays I read, but in _Critique of Post-Colonial Reason_, Spivak's readings of literature have both a shopping (use 1) - just the right Kipling bag to go with the Baudelaire pumps! - and a faintly mystical legalistic title-dispute (use 2) aspect, determining the rightful reading, the reading that properly possesses and is possessed by the literary work: the reading that restores what/who was expropriated. This seems to be at once the violation of certain values (those created by a siniser market) and the reparation of the error of 'ignoring', thus very much an act of fidelity, in the sense also of 'doing justice' to the implied claimaints, Human Affairs. On the other hand there is the constant confession of fetishism, the struggle with it, in which Spivak pits one value - fairness, which is close to truth - against all others (as in a court of equity) and identifies it as a trump. Fidelity is absolutely requisite; the product of unfaithful deconstruction is ideological violence: "these readings, as they deconstruct an error, themselves perform a lie". (CPR, p. 156)
5:00 AM

Le Colonel Chabert said...
(two instances of exchange value, should have said.)
5:01 AM

crojas said...
LCC,
Thanks for your very nice comments.
The tension which you point to between the relation between these two different senses of "possession" as they relate Spivak's project (I particularly like your formulation of her "fetish[....] of fairness, which is close to truth," as well your observation of Spivak's assertion that fidelity is a necessary requisite to a deconstructive project [I made a similar observation yesterday in the other discussion thread to this post]) is well taken. I would suggest, furthermore, that this tension perhaps is most visible when her two identities as translator and critic (of Mahasweta Devi, of Derrida himself) intersect. (traduttore, traditore!)
11:10 AM

roger said...
A totally useful post, Mr. N.G.
Thanks.
1:34 PM

crojas said...
Thanks Roger, once again.
And also, thanks for the nod at the beginning of your fascinating multipart post on lighting and enlightenment. Ties back in nicely with Derrida's "Specters of Marx" theme in the sense that it was precisely the development of artificial light during the nineteenth century which revolutionized the possibilities for the creation of ghostly apparitions (through projections, etc.), thereby informing, perhaps, Marx's fascination with spectrality.
10:23 AM

Amie said...
NG, thanks for this post. i've spent quite a bit of time being a bike messenger, reading derrida, so your post certainly sent some wheels spinning...
4:10 PM

crojas said...
Thanks Amei.
Delivering letters while reading La Carte Postale...sounds exciting, though probably not terribly reassuring to your employer (what with D's fascination with misdirected letters).
5:00 PM

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